Most recent items from Ubuntu feeds:
Lubuntu Blog: “Your fair discourse hath been as sugar, Making the hard way sweet and delectable.” from Planet Ubuntu

As you may have noticed on Twitter, Mastodon, IRC, our mailing lists, and this website, we have now launched a forum using the incredibly popular open source Discourse software. We join Ubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, LXQt, Phabricator, and others that share this powerful tool for communication with us. This forum is a general meeting […]

about 20 hours ago

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E07 – R-Type from Planet Ubuntu

This week we’ve been installing Lineage on a OnePlus One and not migrating Mastodon accounts to ubuntu.social. We round up the Ubuntu community news from Kubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Peppermint OS and we discuss some tech news.

It’s Season 12 Episode 07 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.
In this week’s show:

We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:

Alan has been doing installing Lineage 16 on a OnePlus One.
Mark has not been migrating to ubuntu.social

We discuss the community news:

Kubuntu have Plasma 5.16 beta available for testing
Design and web team summary
Ubuntu MATE 19.10 early development
Ubuntu Flavours Meeting
Peppermint OS 10 released
Canonical announced support for Ubuntu on WSL

We mention some events:

UbuCon Europe 2019 – Call for papers: 10th to 13th of October 2019 – Sintra, Portugal.

We discuss the news:

Google stops doing business with Huawei
IBM 360 Model 20 Rescue and Restoration
MongoDB data held to ransom

Image taken from R-Type arcade machine manufactured in 1987 by Irem.

That’s all for this week! You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube. If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Join us in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram group.

2 days ago

Podcast Ubuntu Portugal: Ep. 56 – Laravel Dingo from Planet Ubuntu

Neste episódio falámos com o José Postiga developer da comunidade Laravel Portugal, e contribuidor para diversos projectos de Software Livre, que migrou recentemente para Ubuntu, graças ao Disco Dingo!

https://www.laravel.pt/
http://laracon.eu/
http://devday.io/

Apoios
Este episódio foi produzido e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço (Thunderclaws Studios – captação, produção, edição, mistura e masterização de som) contacto: thunderclawstudiosPT–arroba–gmail.com.
Atribuição e licenças
A imagem de capa é: “Albino Dingo puppies”by TheGirlsNY is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da [CC0 1.0 Universal License](https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/).
Este episódio está licenciado nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização.

2 days ago

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2019 from Planet Ubuntu

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
Individual reports
In April, 204 work hours have been dispatched among 14 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

Abhijith PA did 4 hours (out of 14 hours allocated, thus carrying over 10 hours to May).
Adrian Bunk did 8 hours (out of 8 hours allocated).
Ben Hutchings did 31.25 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated plus 14 extra hours from April).
Brian May did 10 hours (out of 10 hours allocated).
Chris Lamb did 17 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated, thus carrying over 0.25h to May).
Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 8 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated + 6 extra hours from March, thus carrying over 15.25h to May).
Hugo Lefeuvre did 17.25 hours.
Jonas Meurer did 14 hours (out of 14 hours allocated).
Markus Koschany did 17.25 hours.
Mike Gabriel did 11.5 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated, thus carrying over 5.75h to May).
Ola Lundqvist did 5.5 hours (out of 8 hours allocated + 1.5 extra hours from last month, thus carrying over 4h to May).
Roberto C. Sanchez did 1.75 hours (out of 12 hours allocated, thus carrying over 10.25h to May).
Sylvain Beucler did 17.25 hours.
Thorsten Alteholz did 17.25 hours.

Evolution of the situation
During this month, and after a two-year break, Jonas Meurer became again an active LTS contributor. Still, we continue to be looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested to become a paid LTS contributor.
The number of sponsors did not change. There are 58 organizations sponsoring 215 work hours per month.
The security tracker currently lists 33 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 31 packages needing an update.
Thanks to our sponsors
New sponsors are in bold.

Platinum sponsors:

TOSHIBA (for 43 months)
GitHub (for 34 months)
Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) (for 11 months)

Gold sponsors:

The Positive Internet (for 60 months)
Blablacar (for 59 months)
Linode (for 48 months)
Babiel GmbH (for 38 months)
Plat’Home (for 37 months)

Silver sponsors:

Domeneshop AS (for 59 months)
Nantes Métropole (for 53 months)
Dalenys (for 49 months)
Univention GmbH (for 45 months)
Université Jean Monnet de St Etienne (for 45 months)
Ribbon Communications, Inc. (for 38 months)
maxcluster GmbH (for 32 months)
Exonet B.V. (for 28 months)
Leibniz Rechenzentrum (for 22 months)
Vente-privee.com (for 19 months)
CINECA (for 12 months)
Ministère de l’Europe et des Affaires Étrangères (for 6 months)

Bronze sponsors:

Seznam.cz, a.s. (for 60 months)
Evolix (for 59 months)
MyTux (for 59 months)
Intevation GmbH (for 56 months)
Linuxhotel GmbH (for 56 months)
Daevel SARL (for 55 months)
Bitfolk LTD (for 54 months)
Megaspace Internet Services GmbH (for 54 months)
Greenbone Networks GmbH (for 53 months)
NUMLOG (for 53 months)
WinGo AG (for 52 months)
Ecole Centrale de Nantes – LHEEA (for 48 months)
Sig-I/O (for 46 months)
Entr’ouvert (for 43 months)
Adfinis SyGroup AG (for 41 months)
GNI MEDIA (for 35 months)
Laboratoire LEGI – UMR 5519 / CNRS (for 35 months)
Quarantainenet BV (for 35 months)
Bearstech (for 27 months)
LiHAS (for 27 months)
People Doc (for 23 months)
Catalyst IT Ltd (for 21 months)
Supagro (for 17 months)
Demarcq SAS (for 15 months)
TrapX Security (for 12 months)
NCC Group (for 9 months)
Université Grenoble Alpes

No comment | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

4 days ago

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 579 from Planet Ubuntu

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Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 579 for the week of May 12 – 18, 2019. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

Ubuntu StatsHot in SupportLoCo EventsA couple of snap updatesPlasma 5.15.90 (Plasma 5.16 Beta) Available for TestingCanonical NewsIn the PressIn the BlogosphereOther Articles of InterestFeatured Audio and VideoMeeting ReportsUpcoming Meetings and EventsUpdates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 18.10, and 19.04And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

Krytarik RaidoBashing-omChris GuiverWild ManAnd many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

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Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

5 days ago

Stephen Michael Kellat: A Not So Fun Weekend from Planet Ubuntu

It has not been the easiest of weekends this
weekend. The leased combo modem/wireless hotspot from the cable
company kept dying on me. After the third call, I went to the store
to buy my own. It seems to be working far better now. The leased
equipment was on its third iteration after multiple service
calls.

As not pictured above, I had to visit the emergency room at
Ashtabula County Medical Center. I learned the hard way that I have
a new drug allergy. This humbles me and reminds me that I am not
Superman but rather am easily breakable. I'm still not 100%.

I look forward to following up with primary care Monday
morning.

A
call to raise capital for Erie Looking Productions seems ever
more important now. For those wanting to consider things on a
steadier pace, please consult options listed here.

6 days ago

Jonathan Riddell: libqaccessibilityclient 0.4.1 from Planet Ubuntu

libqaccessibilityclient 0.4.1 is out now

https://download.kde.org/stable/libqaccessibilityclient/

http://embra.edinburghlinux.co.uk/~jr/tmp/pkgdiff_reports/libqaccessibilityclient/0.4.0_to_0.4.1/changes_report.html

Signed by Jonathan Riddell
https://sks-keyservers.net/pks/lookup?op=vindex&search=0xEC94D18F7F05997E

version 0.4.1
Use only undeprecated KDEInstallDirs variables
KDECMakeSettings already cares for CMAKE_AUTOMOC & BUILD_TESTING
Fix use in cross compilation
Q_ENUMS -> Q_ENUM
more complete release instructions
by

6 days ago

Costales: Podcast Ubuntu y otras hierbas S03E05: Reclamación de licencias de Windows y ¿es Android Linux? from Planet Ubuntu

Paco Molinero, Javier Teruelo y Marcos Costales debatiremos si es posible reclamar una licencia de Windows y si Android es realmente Linux ¿?Ubuntu y otras hierbasEscúchanos en:IvooxTelegramYoutubeY en tu cliente de podcast habitual ;)

7 days ago

Kubuntu General News: Plasma 5.15.90 (Plasma 5.16 Beta) Available for Testing from Planet Ubuntu

Are you using Kubuntu 19.04, our current Stable release? Or are you already running our daily development builds?

We currently have Plasma 5.15.90 (Plasma 5.16 Beta)  available in our Beta PPA for Kubuntu 19.04, and in our 19.10 development release daily live ISO images.

For 19.04 Disco Dingo, add the PPA and then upgrade

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/beta && sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade -y

Then reboot. If you cannot reboot from the application launcher,

systemctl reboot

from the terminal.

For already installed 19.10 Eoan Ermine development release systems, simply upgrade your system.

Update directly from Discover, or use the command line:

sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade -y

And reboot. If you cannot reboot from the application launcher,

systemctl reboot

from the terminal.

Otherwise, to test or install the live image grab an ISO build from the daily live ISO images link.

Kubuntu is part of the KDE community, so this testing will benefit both Kubuntu as well as upstream KDE Plasma software, which is used by many other distributions too.

If you believe you might have found a packaging bug, you can use your launchpad.net account is required to post testing feedback to the Kubuntu team. If you believe you have found a bug in the underlying software, then bugs.kde.org is the best place to file your bug report.

Please review the changelog.

[Test Case]* General tests:– Does plasma desktop start as normal with no apparent regressions over 5.15.5?– General workflow – testers should carry out their normal tasks, using the plasma features they normally do, and test common subsystems such as audio, settings changes, compositing, desktop affects, suspend etc.* Specific tests:– Check the changelog:– Identify items with front/user facing changes capable of specific testing. e.g. “clock combobox instead of tri-state checkbox for 12/24 hour display.”– Test the ‘fixed’ functionality.

Testing involves some technical set up to do, so while you do not need to be a highly advanced K/Ubuntu user, some proficiently in apt-based package management is advisable.

Testing is very important to the quality of the software Ubuntu and Kubuntu developers package and release.

We need your help to get this important beta release in shape for Kubuntu 19.10 as well as added to our backports.

Thanks! Please stop by the Kubuntu-devel IRC channel or Telegram group if you need clarification of any of the steps to follow.

7 days ago

Jono Bacon: Global Learning XPRIZE Entries Open Sourced: Get Involved from Planet Ubuntu

Back in 2014 I worked at the XPRIZE Foundation. One of the major reasons I joined was to help launch the Global Learning XPRIZE. This was a $15 million competition, largely funded by Elon Musk, that challenged teams to build an Android app that teaches kids basic reading, writing, and arithmetic, without the aid of a teacher, within 18 months.

When we launched this prize we were astonished by the response. At the time I launched our Global Learning XPRIZE crowdfunding campaign (which raised just under $1 million with a $500k goal) and the new XPRIZE community, and the excitement was palatable. Over 180 teams submitted entries.

These teams were narrowed down to five finalists and extensive field testing trials happened in Tanzania. This in itself was a behemoth task to get tablets and electricity out to such remote areas. This video provides a good overview of this work:

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Awards

Well, this week the competition came to a close. On Wednesday I flew to Los Angeles to join the awards ceremony at the Spruce Goose Hanger at Google. Peter Diamandis kicked the event off, Emily Church introduced the teams, Levar Burton (yep, the guy from Star Trek) did a short speech, and Elon Musk swung by to award the teams before jetting off (no pun intended) to do a rocket launch.

Of the five teams, KitKit School, Team CCI, RoboTutor, onebillion, and Chimple, there was a tie and KitKit School and onebillion were crowned winners. They will split the $10 million prize purse.

It was a fabulous evening and it was wonderful to meet all the teams and see the energy and passion from everyone there. Here are some pictures from the ceremony.

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Also, here is the live stream of the event:

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Just The Beginning

Now, while it was fantastic to see the awards being delivered, what was most interesting to me was the overall impact of these entries across reading, writing, and numeracy:

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Clearly the teams have developed software that really does meet the goals of the challenge: to provide a marked improvement in education for kids who don’t have access to teachers. This is an incredibly encouraging start.

The good news is that all five finalist’s code has now been uploaded to GitHub. You can find the repos by clicking here. All the technology that is driving these educational gains is built for Android is now available under an Apache open source license and the general open source community is welcome to participate.

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In addition to this, the XPRIZE team have set up a discussion forum. This is brand new, but I would encourage those of you who are interested in this project to go and check it out.

Now, as you can imagine, these are five pretty significant codebases, and each has unique attributes. For example, Team CCI has built an authoring platform where you can produce content without coding (similar to Flash). RoboTutor have built an AI-powered voice recognition platform so kids can read the words on the screen, it will listen, and then read back the correct word.

I really want to see this code as the beginning of a new era of educational software that can impact the 250 million+ kids that need access to high quality education delivered via tablets. I can’t think of a better opportunity to built a community around a more meaningful mission

For these projects to succeed though I believe we need to focus on the following key areas, all of which need volunteers (wink wink!):

#1. Get more people involved

With the code now available, I want to encourage you all to go and download these projects, play with them, and start participating.

File issues with bugs and feature ideas, submit pull requests, and reach out to the teams. Feel free to share your ideas and offers of help on the community forum.

#2. Modularize the best elements of the different codebase

I don’t think it is realistic to expect all five of these projects to converge under a single initiative, they are likely too different. I do though think we should try to modularize some of the key tech (such as the examples I gave above) into individual projects.

I am going to reach out to the teams to see what kind of appetite they have for this: from my discussions yesterday, it seems like there is interest in doing this. This will make it easier to collaborate and expand the contributor base.

If we can modularize these pieces and get more of the projects using the same common pieces, it will grow those foundational elements faster as more devs can contribute. As an example, TeamCCI has already offered to fund $100,000 worth of educational content development for the other teams if they use their core Pubbly platform (which is now open source in GitHub.)

#3. Increase localization

Each of these projects is available in English and Swahili, with some of the teams also being localized into Hindi.

There is an enormous opportunity to expand the translations base for these projects. When I was at Canonical, one my proudest memories was how localized Ubuntu was and continues to be: we should do the same for these projects.

These projects should be available in multiple languages, not just the strings, but the content too. With every new language there is the possibility of this software impacting kids in those regions too.

#4. Create documentation for the community and project

With five big new codebases, we could benefit from docs writers to build and maintain a wiki for the project. How to build the projects, join the community, submit pull requests, submit art/design assets…this all needs documenting. Do you want to make an impact on education around the world and do you like writing? Roll them sleeves up and get involved!

So, if you are interested in getting involved, head to the community forum, sign up, and weigh in. There is enormous opportunity here to have an impact: let’s make it happen.

The post Global Learning XPRIZE Entries Open Sourced: Get Involved appeared first on Jono Bacon.

8 days ago

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E06 – International Karate+ from Planet Ubuntu

This week we have been moving servers, discuss the recently announced Librem One services, bring you some command line love and go over your feedback.

It’s Season 12 Episode 06 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.
In this week’s show:

We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:

Mark has been moving servers.

We discuss Librem One.

Underscoring Our Transparency: First Librem One Bug Report
Purism Explains Why There Are Trackers In Librem One Chat

We share a Command Line Lurve:

alias df="df -x squashfs" – Hide snap mounts from df

And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!

Image taken from International Karate+ published in 1987 for Commodore 64 by System 3.

That’s all for this week! You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube. If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Join us in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram group.

9 days ago

Bryan Quigley: 2020 Presidential Tracker now live from Planet Ubuntu

May Update
I've revamped it by creating a single score to summarize all the tests - the goal is to have some useful predictivate quality - and be easier to track over time. To predict how prepared they are for a "bump" or their "monent", but also provide an idea of how much outside actors might be able to meddle with their campaign.
There are 3 different categories:

Performance metrics - The top four are donaldjtrump.com, julianforthefuture.com, joebiden.com, and amyklobuchar.com.
Email security - Top are elizabethwarren.com, hickenlooper.com, corybooker.com, and joebiden.com. They will have a much better time communicating to their supporters.
and other website security metrics

Today's results:

65 - joebiden.com - the highest score. only one with a non-F letter grade, but it's still a D.
55,56 - corybooker.com, hickenlooper.com - both substancially improved over last evaluation.
48,49 - amyklobuchar.com, elizabethwarren.com
Low 40s - betoorourke.com, , michaelbennet.com, johndelaney.com
High 30s - jayinslee.com, marianne2020.com, berniesanders.com, stevebullock.com
Low 30s - donaldjtrump.com, ericswalwell.com, weld2020.org
20s - tulsigabbard.org, kirstengillibrand.com, kamalaharris.org, billdeblasio.com, peteforamerica.com, wayneforamerica.com, timryanforamerica.com
18 - sethmoulton.com
9 - yang2020.com - Will the math lover stand being last?

All the candidates can definitely do better, my website gets a 79. I don't really see anyone geting out of the race before the first debate, so I can't make any clear predictions at this point.
You can get the full details at the 2020 presidential website tracker. .

Original post:
Now it's a tradition (did it in 2016 too)... I'm launching my 2020 presidential website tracker.
I'm being harsh and limiting everyone to a C rating for now. There are some basic things all the candidates really could be doing. If you see a mistake I made or find something new to track, feel free to report a bug/pull request.

10 days ago

Benjamin Mako Hill: The Shifting Dynamics of Participation in an Online Programming Community from Planet Ubuntu

Informal online learning communities are one of the most exciting and successful ways to engage young people in technology. As the most successful example of the approach, over 40 million children from around the world have created accounts on the Scratch online community where they learn to code by creating interactive art, games, and stories. However, despite its enormous reach and its focus on inclusiveness, participation in Scratch is not as broad as one would hope. For example, reflecting a trend in the broader computing community, more boys have signed up on the Scratch website than girls.

In a recently published paper, I worked with several colleagues from the Community Data Science Collective to unpack the dynamics of unequal participation by gender in Scratch by looking at whether Scratch users choose to share the projects they create. Our analysis took advantage of the fact that less than a third of projects created in Scratch are ever shared publicly. By never sharing, creators never open themselves to the benefits associated with interaction, feedback, socialization, and learning—all things that research has shown participation in Scratch can support.

Overall, we found that boys on Scratch share their projects at a slightly higher rate than girls. Digging deeper, we found that this overall average hid an important dynamic that emerged over time. The graph below shows the proportion of Scratch projects shared for male and female Scratch users’ 1st created projects, 2nd created projects, 3rd created projects, and so on. It reflects the fact that although girls share less often initially, this trend flips over time. Experienced girls share much more than often than boys!

<figure class="aligncenter is-resized">Proportion of projects shared by gender across experience levels, measured as the number of projects created, for 1.1 million Scratch users. Projects created by girls are less likely to be shared than those by boys until about the 9th project is created. The relationship is subsequently reversed.</figure>

We unpacked this dynamic using a series of statistical models estimated using data from over 5 million projects by over a million Scratch users. This set of analyses echoed our earlier preliminary finding—while girls were less likely to share initially, more experienced girls shared projects at consistently higher rates than boys. We further found that initial differences in sharing between boys and girls could be explained by controlling for differences in project complexity and in the social connectedness of the project creator.

Another surprising finding is that users who had received more positive peer feedback, at least as measured by receipt of “love its” (similar to “likes” on Facebook), were less likely to share their subsequent projects than users who had received less. This relation was especially strong for boys and for more experienced Scratch users. We speculate that this could be due to a phenomenon known in the music industry as “sophomore album syndrome” or “second album syndrome”—a term used to describe a musician who has had a successful first album but struggles to produce a second because of increased pressure and expectations caused by their previous success

This blog post (published first on the Community Data Science Collective blog) and the paper are collaborative work with Emilia Gan and Sayamindu Dasgupta. You can find more details about our methodology and results in the text of our paper, “Gender, Feedback, and Learners’ Decisions to Share Their Creative Computing Projects” which is freely available and published open access in the Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 2 (CSCW): 54:1-54:23.

12 days ago

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 578 from Planet Ubuntu

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Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 578 for the week of May 5 – 11, 2019. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

Ubuntu StatsHot in SupportUbucon Europe 2019 announcement and Call For PapersLoCo EventsUbuntu Developer Desktop Survey 2019Other Community NewsCanonical NewsIn the BlogosphereFeatured Audio and VideoMeeting ReportsUpcoming Meetings and EventsUpdates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 18.10, and 19.04And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

Krytarik RaidoBashing-omChris GuiverWild ManAnd many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

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Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

12 days ago

Stephen Michael Kellat: Integrating Changes from Planet Ubuntu

You know it is bad when I look for the directions on re-pointing
my entry on Planet Ubuntu and instead first find things about
liberation movements and investment clubs. I finally found a nice
domain name to stick my blog behind. After consideration and
tinkering with quite a bit of software my blog is migrated over to
ikiwiki, of all
things. Looking through the configuration file still shows me a bit
of a graveyard of neglected blogs from yesteryear including things
like Alan Pope's blog found at http://popey.com/blog/.
Not all of my prior blog posts have migrated all that well. The
intermediate waypoint with chronicle was not a
smooth stop. I will go with what I have, though.
Currently my laptop is running Xubuntu 19.04 without too many
incidents. I have two droplets on Digital Ocean running with one on
the LTS and one running 19.04. My main Raspberry Pi, a 3B+, is
running Ubuntu MATE 18.04.2. I'm hanging out in the Ubuntu Podcast chatter on
Telegram lately even though my contributions overall to the
Ubuntu realm have been down. With work being utter chaos and my
being increasingly senior due to increasing attrition I'm finding I
can't quite avoid responsibility lately.
I've written a post entitled Talking Filming which
discusses an off-hours project I am working on. Eventually I need
to get financial backing, form an LLP, and leave my day job as a
civil servant. That is a matter to discuss more fully at another
time, though.
As to An Introduction to C & GUI Programming, I am
apparently the only person shown on LibraryThing
owning a copy currently. I need to spend the time to read and apply
the text. That is another off-hours project I need to get to.
For those who recall the madness related to my job at the
beginning of the year, I can only say that it has not abated. We
are on track for another catastrophe in due time. The only question
is if it will be another lapse in appropriations as of the end of
the day on September 30th or a "debt limit" crisis shortly before
that.
Tomorrow is a new day, thankfully.

13 days ago